Caramelized Fennel and Avocado Quinoa Salad

This was a Mother’s Day concoction… Light, fresh and tasty with a satisfying contrast of sweet, tangy, and rich flavors. Just for giggles, I used a mix of regular and red quinoa for a little extra color. Continue reading


Leek Zucchini Fritters (gluten-free)

Ramps (wild leeks), a fun early season local treat

I have to say, these babies are so tasty I’d like to make them every week. In fact, maybe I will. When cooked traditionally, they are fried and delicious (thus “fritters”). But if you’re not feelin’ the oil, you can also cook them like little pancakes on a dry griddle and they’re still completely satisfying. I’d argue that some oil (when properly chosen) is good for us sometimes, but if you’ve been overdoing it recently, perhaps the lighter version is for you.

The inspiration for this recipe started with a friend mentioning leek fritters a few months ago and it getting stuck in the back of my brain, only to pop out when I saw ramps (wild leeks that come out early in the season) being offered on Idaho’s Bounty, our local/sustainable food co-op. After perusing a recipe in Ottolenghi’s beautiful book, Plenty (if you don’t have it, it’s terrific for inspiration!), and Googling about, here’s what I came up for a gluten-free version, with a little extra vegetable-y goodness from our old friend, the zucchini.

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Buckwheat and Veggies (a la Fried Rice)

...or here it is as Veggie Fried Quinoa... Yum!

We’re enjoying this fun choppy mish-mosh of veggies and grains regularly. While on the Body Ecology Diet, we’ve been experimenting with the few grains allowed. This is a relatively quick and easy recipe that we do all kinds of variations on almost every week.

2 stalks of broccoli
1 red bell pepper
1 zucchini
2 carrots
1 bunch kale
1/2 large red onion
3 cloves garlic
1 inch ginger
2 eggs, lightly beaten
3 cups cooked buckwheat
couple tablespoons each olive oil and toasted sesame oil
couple splashes each raw apple cider vinegar, coconut aminos, and fish sauce

Dice all the veggies, mince the garlic and ginger. Heat a wok on medium to medium-high with the olive oil & sesame oil. Sauté onion, garlic and ginger for a few minutes until onion begins to soften. Add broccoli and carrot and sauté for a few minutes, then add the pepper, zucchini and kale. Splash in vinegar, aminos and fish sauce to taste and cook until veggies are almost tender.

Move veggies up the sides of the wok to create a well at the bottom. Pour the eggs in the well and simmer for a bit and scramble until about three-quarters cooked (don’t worry if a few of the veggies get mixed in). Push the rest of the veggies down, add the buckwheat and mix everything together and cook for just a few minutes longer.

Serve with a wedge of lime and enjoy!

Substitutions & adaptations:

-As always, go crazy with your veggies and use what’s in season or in your fridge.

-Quinoa works very well in this recipe as well. I’m sure there are other grains that would be fun as well.


Roasted Veggies

This easy dish is classic winter comfort food for me. Quantities below are purely negotiable. Increase or decrease anything to your taste. A few years ago, you would never see something so insane as a brussels sprout in any of my recipes. I still clearly remember dinner table stalemates between me and a not to be named former step-parent over those sinister tiny cabbages. However, now that I control the cooking methods, no more plain boiling water treatment for these babies. Nope. Give them a good roasting and voila, no more stalemate. Only tasty, healthy goodness remains.

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Cultured Veggies

OK, you caught me. Yes, “cultured veggies” are also known as sauerkraut, or fermented vegetables. But as someone who historically does not have warm, fuzzy feelings for the sauerkraut you get at restaurants or can buy at the grocery store, I’m telling you the homemade version is pretty awesome. And super good for you, chock full of the partying bacterial probiotics that give it the sour flavor (just like the ones many of us spend good money on from the health food store). But these friendly critters work hard for you, converting raw veggies into a distinctive, tasty dish. And then once you eat them, their work really begins as they populate your gut and kick out all kinds of nasties that you really don’t want to read about here.   Continue reading